Name: Sonya K. Sobrian
Title: Associate Professor

Degree, University, Year: Ph.D., Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, 1975
Email: ssobrian@howard.edu
Phone: (202) 806-7901



Research Interests (A paragraph of 200 words or less):
Dr. Sobrian has an active research program in developmental neurobehavioral pharmacology.  
The major focus of her research involves the behavioral and neurotoxicological consequences of prenatal and neonatal drug administration, and stress-induced alterations in behavioral and immunological development.  Her current research involves the life-span consequences of prenatal exposure to cocaine and nicotine, alone and in combination, and the role of loud noise in the etiology of autism and depression.  Dr. Sobrian was the first Fulbright Scholar from the College of Medicine; as Research Fellow in Yugoslavia,  she explored the immunological consequences of ontogenetic exposure to stressors.  She was also the recipient of a AAAS Science and Engineering Congressional Fellowship, which allowed her to work on legislative issues involving the elderly, adoption and alcohol.  When she is not in the lab, Dr. Sobrian performs classical choral masterworks with community groups; she can also be seen singing and dancing for charity with Hexagon, Washington’s original, political, satirical revue company.  
    

Selected Publications (five):

Sobrian, S.K., Holson, R.R.  Effects of pre-and neonatal nicotine exposure in rodents: inconsistent evidence.  ILAR Journal, 2011, 52: 251-294. (Invited Review)

Sobrian SK, Holson RR. Social behavior of offspring following prenatal cocaine     exposure in rodents: a comparison with prenatal alcohol. Front Psychiatry. 2011,2:1-17. Epub 2011 Nov 30 (Invited Review)

Sobrian, S.K., Johnston, M.., Wright, J., Kuhn, D., and Ameis, K.  Prenatal nicotine and or cocaine differentially alters nicotine-induced sensitization in aging offspring.  Ann. NY Acad. Sci., 2008, 1139: 466-477.

Sobrian, S.K., Marr, L. and Ressman, K.: Prenatal cocaine and/or nicotine exposure produces depression and anxiety in aging rats.  Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 2003, 27: 501-518.

Sobrian, S.K.,
Jones B.L., James, H., Kamara, F.N, and Holson, R.R.: Prenatal Ethanol Preferentially Enhances Reactivity of the Dopamine D1 but not D2 or D3 Receptors in Offspring. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 2005, 27: 73-93.

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